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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014
PostPosted: Thu Nov 20, 2014 2:37 pm 
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BIRDCAM.IT NEWS. The liberation of Thybris, peregrine falcon son of Appius and Virgin born in 2013, admitted to a few months to CRFS Lipu Rome. Was sick and had the shot in the body. Today has taken flight. Good luck!
(Photo Francesca Lycopolis)


This is his story raccontataci from CRFs of rome:
the peregrine falcon was found in the earth 24/04/2014 at Tor Bella Monaca and taken the same day to the recovery center where x-rays showed birdshot (3) within the body and a large hematoma at of the radius and ulna claims. There were no fractures but the animal had problems plumage pretty important on primary and caudal perhaps caused by improper transport.
The general state was still quite good apart from a slight weakening.
After about a month the wing has regained full mobility and the animal returned to full health, unfortunately problems plumage forced us to wait a few months for the complete regrowth of pens essential for flight.
As for the shot is difficult to determine if they were the cause of the trauma or if took them in another occasion, it is certain that if he was shot in April with hunting and closed within the city is quite disturbing ..


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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014
PostPosted: Thu Nov 20, 2014 9:00 pm 
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:sum9: I REMEMBER THIS! HAVE A GREAT LIFE THYBRIS!!! :loveheart2:


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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014
PostPosted: Thu Nov 20, 2014 10:03 pm 
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:leafok: Happy life THYBRIS,
fly high fly fast & fly safe.

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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014
PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2014 11:02 pm 
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CAN BIRDS BE TRAINED TO BRING DOWN DRONES?
YES, BUT IT'S NOT A GOOD IDEA


As costs go down and ease of use goes up, more and more drones are going to enter American skies. Last month, the Federal Aviation Authority reported an increase in drones spotted near other aircraft, raising fears that an errant drone may imperil a manned airplane. But drones don’t just pose a risk to human-made aircraft. They can also threaten birds.
More from Falconers on this and a few beautiful pictures:

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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Thu Jan 08, 2015 2:48 am 
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US Wind Power Outfit Whacked with $2.5 million Fine for Rampant Bald Eagle Slaughter
pictures here: ONE IS NOT PRETTY

The rampant slaughter of millions of birds and bats – including rare, endangered and majestic species, like America’s iconic golden eagle – is one of the many ‘inconvenient’ facts that moves the wind industry to lie like fury and – when the corpses can no longer be hidden and the lying fails – to issue court proceedings to literally bury those facts (see our post here).
But – in America, at least – the ‘inconvenient’ facts are starting to catch up with a vengeance, as US authorities start to do their jobs, finally punishing wind power outfits for what is nothing less than the pointless slaughter of thousands of rare, endangered and, what should be, protected birds.
Wind farm operator fined $2.5 million related to bird deaths in Wyoming
Associated Press
19 December 2014
CHEYENNE, Wyoming — Wind farm operator PacifiCorp Energy will pay $2.5 million in fines after pleading guilty Friday to charges related to the deaths of protected birds in Wyoming.
The subsidiary of Portland, Oregon-based PacifiCorp pleaded guilty in federal court in Wyoming to two counts of violating the federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act under a plea deal with prosecutors.
The U.S. Justice Department said the charges stemmed from the discovery of more than 370 dead birds at the company’s Seven Mile Hill and Glenrock/Rolling Hills wind projects in Carbon and Converse counties from 2009 until now. Authorities counted 38 dead golden eagles and 336 other dead protected birds, including hawks, blackbirds, larks, wrens and sparrows.
It’s the second prosecution of a wind energy company for harming or killing protected birds. Duke Energy pleaded guilty last year to killing eagles and other birds at two Wyoming wind farms.
An Associated Press investigation last year documented how the Obama administration, which has championed pollution-free wind power, was failing to enforce protections for birds at wind energy facilities nationwide, including at PacifiCorp facilities in Wyoming.
At the time, PacifiCorp told the AP that the company was never fined or prosecuted because the wind turbines might not be to blame.
Federal prosecutors alleged PacifiCorp Energy failed to make all reasonable efforts to avoid birds dying by colliding with wind turbines despite prior guidance from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. However, in a statement Friday, prosecutors noted the company has co-operated with the wildlife service’s investigation and has already implemented measures aimed at minimizing bird deaths.
Under the deal, PacifiCorp Energy must implement a plan to reduce bird deaths at its four Wyoming sites, and its progress will be monitored for the next five years.
“We are committed to enhancing protections to wildlife that minimize and mitigate impacts,” said Mark Tallman, PacifiCorp’s vice-president for renewable resources.
Michael Hutchins of the American Bird Conservancy said he hoped the deal sends a warning that “poorly sited wind projects known to pose a threat to birds will finally be held accountable.”
Of the $2.5 million in fines, $400,000 will go to the North American Wetlands Conservation Fun, $200,000 will be paid to Wyoming, and $1.9 million will go to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation to pay for projects aimed at preserving golden eagles and studying ways to minimize harm to the birds from wind farms.
Associated Press
Here’s the earlier story, referred to in the piece above.
U.S. power company pleads guilty to killing eagles at wind farms
Associated Press
Dina Cappiello
23 November 2013
WASHINGTON — A major U.S. power company has pleaded guilty to killing eagles and other birds at two Wyoming wind farms as part of the first enforcement of environmental laws protecting birds against wind energy facilities.
Under the settlement Friday, North Carolina-based Duke Energy Corp. and its renewable energy arm agreed to pay $1 million. Much of the money will go toward conservation efforts.
The company pleaded guilty to killing 14 eagles and 149 other birds at two wind farms outside Casper, Wyo., from 2009 to 2013.
Wind farms are clusters of turbines as tall as 30-story buildings, with spinning rotors.
Before the case, no wind energy company had been prosecuted for the death of an eagle or other protected bird — even though such deaths are usually a federal violation.
Associated Press

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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Thu Jan 08, 2015 10:41 am 
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thanks for sharing the report KF. $2.5 million, not enough, but a start. :furious:

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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Sat Jan 10, 2015 3:11 pm 
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we have these in southern alberta also and they infuriate me.

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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Mon Jan 19, 2015 9:45 pm 
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Endangered short-eared owls flock to Pittsburgh International Airport
By Bobby Kerlik
Sunday, Jan. 18, 2015, 10:27 p.m.
Updated 11 hours ago

When wildlife biologist Bobby Hromack helped trap and relocate four endangered owls a year ago at Pittsburgh International Airport, he didn't expect to see the same type of owl this year.
In the past several weeks, he has trapped three more short-eared owls and released them about 25 miles away in Washington County.

“It seems they like to feed in the (airport) fields in the winter,” said Hromack, who's assigned to the airport from the Department of Agriculture. “We've been seeing them in congregations of three to eight.”
The short-eared owl is considered endangered in Pennsylvania, although not nationwide. Short-eared owls have small tufts on the top of their heads and round, beige faces similar to barn owls. Pennsylvania is considered the southern end of their breeding range in North America. The birds are smaller compared with other owls at 13 to 17 inches tall with a wingspan ranging from 38 to 48 inches, he said.
The birds must be removed from around the airport because of the potential strike risk to planes, Hromack said. He takes part in 144 wildlife surveys per year on airport grounds with assistance from the Allegheny County Airport Authority's wildlife administrator Ben Shertzer.

Wildlife strikes to planes nationwide nearly doubled in the decade leading up to 2011 to more than 10,000, according to a report from the Federal Aviation Administration. More than 500 of those strikes in 2011 caused damage.
Hromack used a unique trap to capture the owls, which primarily eat voles and small rodents. He set up poles in the predators' hunting area and when the owls landed on the top, a trap springs shut, capturing the birds unharmed.
Bob Mulvihill, an ornithologist with the National Aviary in the North Side, put a small metal band around a leg on each bird. He did the same for the owls captured last year. None of the newly captured owls had a band.

“This allows us to band them and get their age, sex and health. Having a species like this is not normal. It's a special case,” Mulvihill said. “The owls were all in excellent health. They were first-year birds, meaning this is their first winter.”
He said three of the owls were likely female.
Airport officials take several measures to keep birds, deer and other animals away. Grass is cut to between six and 10 inches, long enough to give ground prey cover, but too short for the grass to produce seeds, which attracts other types of birds. The type of grass planted is unpalatable to grass-eating birds, particularly waterfowl, Hromack said.
Bushes are kept trimmed, and standing water is removed. Officials cull deer on airport land.
“If anything is posing a direct threat on the runway, we're authorized to use lethal force,” he said. :furious:
Bobby Kerlik is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-320-7886 Read more:


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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Wed Jan 21, 2015 3:44 pm 
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80 birds dead, 300 affected as experts try to unravel goo mystery :gaaaaah:

By Peter Fimrite Updated 9:50 pm, Tuesday, January 20, 2015

The number of dead and dying aquatic birds on San Francisco Bay soared past 300 on Tuesday as animal rescuers expanded their search to the western shoreline after birds covered in a mysterious goo were found in Foster City.
At least 80 birds found along the East Bay shoreline died after their feathers were coated with the glue-like compound, and state wildlife officials say they are collecting more carcasses by the hour.
Field workers have brought about 300 birds with gunked-up feathers to International Bird Rescue, an aquatic bird rescue center in Fairfield. That includes three surf scoters collected in Foster City on Tuesday morning and two collected there Sunday.

PICTURES & MORE ARTICLE HERE:

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Trap snares eagle and the woman who says she freed it
Posted: January 21, 2015 - 12:10am

A Juneau woman who was cited by Alaska Wildlife Troopers for hindering lawful trapping might have a really good legal defense: She was trying to free an ensnared eagle.

The Empire reported Sunday that troopers believe 39-year-old Kathleen K. Adair intentionally sprung several traps that were legally set to catch fur-bearing animals. She was charged with a misdemeanor criminal offense.

PICTURE & MORE ARTICLE HERE:


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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Wed Jan 21, 2015 5:50 pm 
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Not good news at all. :furious:

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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Fri Jan 23, 2015 11:27 pm 
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THIS IS THE KIND OF ARTICLE I LIKE TO POST :sum9:
Picture of the beauty is here:

Another eagle finds a home on Hogback, Vermont
Getting comfortable: Another eagle finds a home on Hogback Welcoming party: Southern Vermont Natural History Museum hosts event Feb. 16

MARLBORO >> The Southern Vermont Natural History Museum is welcoming a new bald eagle to its animal family on Hogback Mountain.
This will be the museum's second eagle. After the first eagle arrived in May 2013, an event to name the bird was organized.
"We thought it was worthwhile doing the same with this guy," said Assistant Museum Director Michael Clough.
The eagle welcoming party will be held from 2 to 4 p.m. on Feb. 16. Admission will be free and there will be snacks as well as activities for the children. Prizes will be given to those who dress as an eagle or bird. A one-day special discount will give attendees the opportunity to purchase a one year family pass for $25, which comes with an eagle decal.
Eagle expert and photographer Bill Dean will speak and Clough said an "up close meeting" with the eagles will be held around 2:30 or 3 p.m.
The museum had received a call from the Minnesota Raptor Center. Museum directors had spoken with officials from the center while they were looking to host their first eagle.
"They thought we might want another eagle," said Clough. "Our permits and enclosures are adequate for two birds."
The eagle flew in via airplane to Hartford, Conn., and arrived at the museum on Dec. 10. It was unclear how the eagle got injured but nerve damage was detected.
"They found him out in a big field, dragging his wing around," said Clough. "Eagles fly from power lines from time to time. They didn't think it was a car hit. It's kind of a mystery."
After some rehabilitation, the eagle is now able to fly as high as 50 feet off the ground. That is nowhere near as high as healthy eagles can fly, Clough told the Reformer.
The first eagle the museum received has permanent wing injury and is unable to fly. She was shipped from a rehabilitation facility in Wyoming, known as the Ironside Bird Rescue. The museum had to ensure there was an adequate habitat for the eagle when submitting an application for a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services permit.

Contact Chris Mays at 802-254-2311, ext. 273.

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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Fri Jan 23, 2015 11:32 pm 
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:snowflake2:

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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Sat Jan 24, 2015 11:10 am 
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Fantastic! :snowflake4:

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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Sun Feb 01, 2015 7:40 pm 
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Apex predators serve important role in ecosystem

There has been a lot of discussion lately about the critical role apex predators play in the ecosystem. An apex predator is one at the top of the food chain, or one who “as an adult, has no natural predator within its ecosystem.” In Santa Clara County, apex predators would include mountain lions, bobcats, coyotes, hawks, falcons and large owls.
A 2013 film explains the importance of apex predators in simple, beautifully illustrated terms. Called “How Wolves Change Rivers,” the film describes the environmental changes that occurred when wolves, hunted out of Yellowstone National Park in the 1930s, were re-introduced to the park in the mid-90s. Although criticized by some as a bit over-simplistic, the film’s thesis is worth re-telling here as an example of the influence apex predators have on an entire ecosystem.
Since wolves had been gone from the park for nearly 70 years, the native elk had few natural predators and the elk population exploded. The unnaturally large population of elk had grazed much of the park down to bare roots and many of the park’s native plants were destroyed. When wolves were reintroduced, they naturally killed some of the elk. As a result, the elk began to avoid certain parts of the park where they were more vulnerable to wolves.
The native plants in the areas the elk avoided regenerated. When aspen, willow and cottonwood trees started to grow again, native birds returned. Beavers, who eat the bark of the trees and use the branches for lodges and dams, moved back in. They dammed the river, because that is what beavers do, causing ponds to develop and providing habitat for creatures like river otters, muskrat, fish and ducks.
The wolves also preyed on coyotes, which reduced their population and caused the population of rabbits and mice to increase. The return of small rodents—prey of animals like weasels, hawks and foxes—caused more of those species to move back into the park. Ravens and bald eagles returned to feed on the carrion left by the wolves. Bears, who also eat carrion, returned too.
But the ultimate changes in the ecosystem of the park were even more significant. Because of the reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone Park, the nature of the rivers actually changed. When more native trees were allowed to grow along the banks of the rivers, the banks were reinforced and the channels of the rivers deepened. Rivers that had become wide and shallow with the absence of wolves became narrow and deeper, creating habitat for creatures that had not been there in decades.
A recent review of “How Wolves Change Rivers” summed up this “trophic effect” eloquently: “Human/wildlife conflict is a reality of growing populations around the world, and the fact is that we need to learn to live beside wildlife if we are to maintain our wonderful thriving ecosystems in the future.”


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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Mon Feb 02, 2015 11:39 am 
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Excellent KF. It is all related. I often think I would like to eradicate mosquitoes, but I wonder what consequences would result down the line that might make a mosquito bite a better thing...

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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Wed Feb 04, 2015 11:17 pm 
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Home » State » Washington
Bird flu strikes 4th Washington flock, spreads to hawks

Published:
February 4, 2015 10:39AM

New cases of a avian influenza cases continue to break out, this time in north-central Washington.
Highly pathogenic avian influenza has swept through another mixed-bird backyard flock in Washington. Meanwhile, authorities have confirmed the virus is afflicting native raptors.
The Washington State Department of Agriculture on Monday established a quarantine zone 6 miles around where about 100 birds, raised primarily as a youth project, were infected in Okanogan County near the Canada border.
The virus rapidly killed about half of the birds before tests confirmed Saturday that they were avian flu victims. The surviving birds will be euthanized, according to WSDA.
The flock was in Oroville, about 40 miles from where 5,000 game birds were infected last week in Riverside. In that case, the virus killed 40 pheasants and 12 turkeys before it was confirmed. The surviving game birds were euthanized Tuesday.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture has yet to identify the specific bird flu strain in either case, though officials have determined the virus was highly pathogenic.
State Veterinarian Joe Baker said there was no known connection between the game bird farm and the backyard flock.
“Right now, we have to chalk it up to coincidence,” he said.
Baker said no commercial poultry farms are inside the quarantine zone.
The Oroville flock is the fourth non-commercial batch of birds to be struck by avian influenza in Washington state since early January. Two flocks were in Benton County in south-central Washington, while the other flock was in Clallam County on the Olympic Peninsula.
Single non-commercial flocks in Oregon and Idaho also have been infected.
Baker said the Oroville flock, like the others, was likely infected by migratory waterfowl, which carry avian influenza but are immune to the virus.
The virus has been found in migrating ducks in six states and at commercial poultry farms in British Columbia, Canada, and California.
In the first cases involving raptors, the USDA has confirmed a Cooper’s hawk in Whatcom County and a red-tailed hawk in Skagit County tested positive for highly pathogenic H5N2 bird flu. The virus is a mixed of Eurasian and North American avian influenza strains.
Tests are pending on at least two other raptors collected in Washington — a red-tailed hawk from Benton County and a peregrine falcon from Grays Harbor County.
Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife veterinarian Kristin Mansfield said raptors don’t pose the same threat as migratory waterfowl as spreaders of the virus. A raptor with bird flu doesn’t survive long, she said. “It kills them pretty quick.”
The Department of Fish and Game collected the Cooper’s hawk Dec. 29 and the red-tailed hawk Jan. 9. The USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratories on Jan. 26 confirmed that the hawks had avian influenza.
The Cooper’s hawk was actually the victim of a predator, though it surely would have died soon from the virus, Mansfield said.
The falcon was electrocuted and the hawk in Benton County was killed by something that inflicted a blow, she said.
Mansfield said there’s too little evidence to draw conclusions, but it’s possible the virus affects their brains and makes raptors vulnerable, hastening their deaths. “It does raise the question,” she said.
Mansfield anticipated avian influenza striking raptors since a captive gyrfalcon in Whatcom County in December died after eating an infected wild duck. The incident showed the virus kills raptors.

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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 2015 11:00 pm 
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Michigan's bald eagles full of flame retardants

What does your old couch have to do with the health of the nation’s most iconic bird? More than you think.



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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Tue Feb 10, 2015 7:02 pm 
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This does not surprise me. Saddens me, but does not surprise me. :furious:

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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Wed Feb 18, 2015 11:08 pm 
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Energy and Environment
Bald eagles are starting to flourish again — but hold the confetti


By Darryl Fears February 18 at 2:36 PM

Working late in a tiny Arkansas lab, Susan Wilde found herself alone with a killer.
It startled her. She jumped, let out a yelp, and took off down a hall. Wilde wasn’t running for her life; she was amazed by a discovery. She had uncovered a bacteria, one with a powerful toxin that attacked waterfowl, hiding on the underside of an aquatic leaf that grows nearly everywhere in the United States, including the Chesapeake Bay.
After 20 years of testing determined that the bacteria had never before been recorded, and the brain lesions it cause had never before been found before that night in 1994, Wilde recently gave her discovery a name: Aetokthonos hydrillicola. The Greek word means “eagle killer” for its ability to quickly kill the birds of prey. It’s the latest threat to a raptor that is starting to flourish after being removed from the endangered species list.
A lot more info, pictures & video here:


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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Sat Feb 28, 2015 12:36 pm 
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Battling Bald Eagles rescued from tree

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YH7OWYTYb-M#t=203

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