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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Thu Mar 12, 2015 11:47 pm 
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Quit my job in October. Drove to Oregon in November. Returned to California to volunteer at IBRRC after the Cosco Busan oil spill. This is my trip back to California.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rMD3ypETer8#t=91

Sorry -- I couldn't make the smart link work

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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Sat Mar 14, 2015 1:27 pm 
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Illinois to remove peregrine falcon from threatened list

SPRINGFIELD — A bird that was nearly wiped out of existence by a now-banned pesticide is poised to come off of Illinois' threatened species list.



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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Tue Mar 17, 2015 1:39 am 
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Thousands of snow geese fall dead from sky in Idaho

BY LAURA ZUCKERMAN
SALMON, Idaho Mon Mar 16, 2015 11:14pm EDT
(Reuters) - Avian cholera is suspected in the deaths of at least 2,000 snow geese that fell dead from the sky in Idaho while migrating to nesting grounds on the northern coast of Alaska, wildlife managers said Monday.

Dozens of Idaho Department of Fish and Game workers and volunteers at the weekend retrieved and incinerated carcasses of snow geese found near bodies of water and a wildlife management area in the eastern part of the state, said agency spokesman Gregg Losinski.

Avian cholera is believed to be the culprit in the deaths mostly because of the way the birds died, he said.

“Basically, they just fell out of the sky,” said Losinski.

He said biologists were awaiting results from a state wildlife lab to confirm the birds died of the highly contagious disease, which is caused by bacteria that can survive in soil and water for up to four months.

Humans face a small risk of contracting the disease but the more immediate threat is to wildlife in the vicinity of contaminated carcasses, Losinski said.

About 20 bald eagles were seen near areas where snow geese carcasses littered the ground but a lengthy incubation period makes it unclear if the eagles were infected and would carry the ailment elsewhere, said Losinski.

It was not known where the snow geese – named for their white plumage and for breeding in the far northern corners of Alaska, Canada, Greenland and Siberia – contracted avian cholera during a migration that saw them wing north from wintering grounds in the American Southwest and Mexico, he said.

Outbreaks like the one found affecting the migrating snow geese in Idaho occur periodically in the United States and elsewhere, Losinski said.

Avian cholera is the most important infectious disease affecting wild waterfowl in North America, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

(Editing by Sharon Bernstein and Paul Tait)


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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2015 9:24 pm 
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This is a Great Horned Owlet that our surrogate McTavish is raising.

Baby came from the Lowe's garden center in Evansville Indiana where his parents [for the second year] built their nest while no one was looking in the dead of winter. Of course when Lowe's began stocking the garden center at the beginning of March, the parent went on full attack. Baby removed and nest taken down.
Cute little feller! :flirty:


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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Thu Apr 30, 2015 11:50 pm 
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Bird flu found in first wild Minnesota raptor

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources collected the dead Cooper’s hawk in Yellow Medicine County as part of its effort to track and understand the spread of H5N2 bird flu. Waterfowl don’t themselves get sick or die from the flu, but raptors — birds of prey — are thought to die once infected.

A homeowner near St. Leo reported that on April 14, the Cooper’s hawk flew into his home’s deck and died. “The immediate cause of death was running into a window,” said Patrick Redig, a University of Minnesota veterinary professor and co-founder of the school’s Raptor Center. Later testing showed that the bird had been exposed to H5N2.

The hawk discovery doesn’t indicate the virus in wild birds is the direct cause of the bird flu, said Lou Cornicelli, DNR Wildlife Research manager. Yellow Medicine County doesn’t have any infected poultry farms, but nearby Lyon County does.

The DNR said it does not know of any recent raptor die-offs

More here:

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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Fri May 01, 2015 11:05 am 
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Oh dear.

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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Fri May 01, 2015 6:56 pm 
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Eagle release that I "helped" with. I was the official transporter and spent about 5 hours in the car yesterday. All worth it.



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Photo by Steve Grile Photography

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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Fri May 01, 2015 7:30 pm 
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Gigi - Thanks for posting the article with the good news about the eagle that was rescued, nursed back to health, and released back to the wild. Kudos to you and everyone else involved in the eagle's care and rehab.

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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Fri May 01, 2015 7:53 pm 
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Gigi to take part in the release must have been thrilling for you! :hapdance:

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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Fri May 01, 2015 11:26 pm 
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:sum9: I'm so jealous, but serious how awesome for you gigi.

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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Sat May 02, 2015 12:12 pm 
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Once Chris opened the crate door, he left very quickly. It was wonderful to see him fly away. We are all wondering if he has a mate somewhere...

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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Sun May 03, 2015 12:21 am 
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Returning an animal to the wild makes it all worthwhile!

Last year at this time the USPS in Oakland trimmed the nest trees filled with Snowy Egrets (SNEG) and Black-crowned Night Herons (BCNH). This was illegal for two reasons: the ficus trees belong to the City of Oakland, not USPS. Also, under the Migratory Bird Act of 1918, it is against the law to interfere with these birds, their nests, eggs, etc. Baby birds fell from the trees onto the concrete sidewalks below. The owner of the tree-trimming service was horrified and even visited International Bird Rescue, where the injured youngsters were taken. He made a generous donation and promised to inform other tree trimmers about baby bird season.

I went to that area yesterday and was pleased to see so many nests in the trees. Only one baby bird on the ground, which must have fallen at least two weeks ago. That is to be expected, but the fact that the ground is so hard means broken bones and death for these fragile youngsters. I visited the site several times last year and transported one fallen youngster to Bird Rescue. Unfortunately, his head trauma meant he had to be euthanized.

These birds should be closer to Lake Merritt. Many of them migrated to these ficus trees because they were wonderful for nests. The problem is that BCNH fledge around one month of age. But they don't fly until they are about six weeks. They forage on the ground with their parents. But there isn't anything hear for them to eat...

Here is what I saw:


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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Sun May 03, 2015 6:54 pm 
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Gosh, I remember that horrible incident last year. Broke my heart. Looks like this year all is going well. Can the post office do something humane to discourage nesting. I just hate that the little ones fall on such a hard surface. And the amount of ground time before fledging is so long. Lots can go wrong.
Thanks for your video of this year! Hope all goes well. :flirty:

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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Mon May 04, 2015 1:28 pm 
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Golden Gate Audubon wanted to put some soft materials around the tree and surround it with a low fence. Oakland did not approve. I read on FB that this had been done in Santa Rosa, but I've been unable to find the post.

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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Mon May 04, 2015 7:30 pm 
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beans wrote:
Golden Gate Audubon wanted to put some soft materials around the tree and surround it with a low fence. Oakland did not approve. I read on FB that this had been done in Santa Rosa, but I've been unable to find the post.
Was that the town of Oakland or the post office? It kills me that birds seem to be considered collateral damage...

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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Tue May 05, 2015 1:35 pm 
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The sidewalks belong to Oakland, so I believe the City would have to make the decision. USPS doesn't own the trees or the sidewalks. It's a shame. These birds are simply nesting in the wrong place, but this is the case with many birds as cities grow larger and natural landscapes disappear.

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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2015 1:54 pm 
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I just received this from Mother Nature Network

Flash mob paints Oakland's sidewalks to protect urban nesting herons
After last year's traumatic nesting season, bird lovers are creatively increasing awareness of herons.

Read more: http://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/animal ... z3ZNkt7Uuj

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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2015 5:30 pm 
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I hope this has a good ending.

Bear spending day near Duluth City Hall climbs down from one tree, makes run for another


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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 2015 1:17 am 
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Peregrine falcon populations on the road to recovery, but still face barriers
BY 1CLICKNEWS ON JUNE 16, 2015
They’re the fastest member of the animal kingdom, but experts say the peregrine falcon’s fight to claw back from the brink of extinction isn’t progressing fast enough.
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They’re the fastest member of the animal kingdom, but experts say the peregrine falcon’s fight to claw back from the brink of extinction isn’t progressing fast enough.

The bird of prey became an endangered species in the 1960s in many areas across the world because of the widespread use of certain pesticides, especially DDT.

And while extensive bans on the pesticide in the 1970s, and innovative nest protections — including the placement of man-made nest boxes on buildings and towers across the continent — helped boost their numbers, there are still only 3,300 in North America.

"(The peregrine falcon) is still in its recovery, it has yet to recover to historical levels as a result of decontamination and a lot of environmental challenges," Mark Nash, the executive director of the Canadian Peregrine Foundation, told CTV News.

The foundation’s headquarters in Toronto is one of the many buildings across the country with a peregrine-friendly roof. And this year, the organization welcomed a new falcon into the family.

"We have a nest box now on the roof and they were successful this year in producing a … baby male peregrine falcon," said Nash.

The eyas is named Atlas, and he went for first checkup on Monday at the Lakeridge Hospital in Oshawa, Ont.

Hospital officials tagged, weighed and weighed the chick in hopes of gathering more information about the recovery of the peregrine falcon population.

"What they’re trying to do in both Canada and the United States (is) monitor that the peregrines are successfully increasing in population," said Kevin Empey, the CEO of Lakeridge Health.

The lightning-quick bird, which can reach speeds of over 322 kilometres per hour during steep dives, are also gaining fame for their webcam appearances. Many of the man-made nest box that have been set up on rooftops and in towers in cities across the world feature cameras that have captured precious family moments.

In April, a peregrine falcon named Chroma, which set up shop above CTV Kitchener’s studio, was recorded taking its first flight.

The Canadian Peregrine Foundation and Waterloo Region Nature built a nesting box for a family of falcons in the building’s microwave tower, and have been monitoring the family’s progress ever since.

But this spring there has been a setback, as peregrine falcon experts say that cold and damp weather in parts of the continent has prevented many eggs from hatching. This has led to the deaths of hundreds of unborn birds and a mortality rate of 80 per cent.

Experts say the species has yet to land on solid ground.

"They’re still in such small numbers (that) they need to be protected," said Dale Ingrey, a spokesman for Waterloo Region Nature
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With a report from CTV’s Peter Akman

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 Post subject: Re: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND REHABILITATION~2014-2015
PostPosted: Wed Jul 01, 2015 12:13 pm 
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Bald eagle killers to face more penalties in Pennsylvania

Anyone killing a bald eagle, or a golden eagle, in Pennsylvania will face additional penalties under a proposal that the Pennsylvania Board of Game Commissioners gave preliminary approval on Tuesday.

On top of federal fines and possible imprisonment, eagle-killers in Pennsylvania would also be charged $2,500 per bird as replacement cost, if commissioners approve the proposal again at their September meeting.

Replacement cost for eagles currently stands at just $200 per bird because eagles are no longer listed as threatened or endangered in Pennsylvania.

Learn more about bald eagles in Pennsylvania.

The bald eagle was removed from the state's list of threatened species in early 2014, when it was determined that recovery efforts for the species within Pennsylvania had been widely successful.

Although neither species is on the federal Endangered Species List, both remain protected by the federal Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, which carries a fine of as much as $5,000 and possible imprisonment for up to one year for a first-offense eagle killing, $10,000 and up to two years for a second conviction, and $250,000 or two years for a felony conviction. The fine doubles for an organization.

The Game Commission has yet to release its annual pre-4th of July count of eagle nests across Pennsylvania, but earlier this year Patti Barber, endangered bird biologist with the commission, said there are more than 300 nests in the state.

More than 15 new nests have been reported to the commission so far this year, and there likely are many other new nests that have not been called to the commission's attention.

"There are actually a lot more nests around, but no one's really put the puzzle together to realize there's an extra pair here or there," she explained. For example, a new nest may be erected in a remote spot between two already known nests, and people spotting the new birds may not realize they are new because they're accustomed to spotting bald eagles in that area.

The commission announced a total of 254 nests in 59 of the state's 67 counties last year.

In 1983, when the commission launched a seven-year reintroduction program in which Haldeman Island in the Susquehanna River near Duncannon played a central role, only three bald eagle pairs were nesting statewide.

Most have cheered the recovery of the bald eagle, but not everyone. In May a Carbon County man pleaded guilty to one of the most recent incidents of shooting a bald eagle in Pennsylvania, an offense he committed in April that also saw five protected great blue herons killed.


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