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 Post subject: UK MIGRATION ~ 2013
PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2012 1:16 pm 
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PLEASE START 2013 POSTS HERE


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 Post subject: Re: UK MIGRATION ~ 2013
PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 2013 5:09 pm 
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Loch Garten Osprey diary
A wee up-date, in haste.....


richard thaxton
26 Jan 2013 1:20 PM

Caledonia is well N of Seville. Since the last download she has spent her time around the Rivera de Huelva site with some short trips to perch on the farm (Finca Quijano) plantation.

On 18 Jan at 16.00 hrs and again on 21 Jan at 16.00 hrs she was flying S over the Canal De Alfonso XIII and on 21 Jan at 16.00 hrs she was flying over the northern end of the canal towards the Huelva site. There is obviously some attraction for her in the W Seville area and it would be nice to know where she goes. It may be back to her original roost site in the industrial area on the Canal.

The missing data from the previous download has appeared and on 13 Jan at 16.00 hrs and 14 Jan at 08.00 hours she was perched on the edge of the reservoir, Embalse Del agrio some 27 km NW of the Huelva roost site.

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 Post subject: Re: UK MIGRATION ~ 2013
PostPosted: Fri Feb 01, 2013 1:13 pm 
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:sum9: Loch Garten osprey diary :sum9:

She's been seen!!.......
richard thaxton 31 Jan 2013 4:36 PM

...possibly. We are not entirely sure, yet, but we believe Caledonia has been spotted.

More on that in a moment, but first the latest on Caley's movements, from the most recent data received from Mike is as follows.

Only 6 of 14 tracking points were available for download today so the data is a little sparse. Most of the records show Caledonia to be in her usual spot on the Rivera de Huelva. On 25 January she was a few kilometres away, S of the Rivera and over the Rio Guadalquivir travelling W. On 30 January she was settled on the bank of the Rio some 3.5 km SE of the Rivera de Huelva. The missing data for this week is likely to be available at the next download on 7 February.

Now, no sooner had Mike's e-mail arrived with that latest data above, when ping went my Inbox and I received an e-mail from Spain. It was from Roberto Muriel, who is working at the Biological Station of Doñana in Sevilla city, in the team that has carried out the osprey reintroduction project in Andalusia, by hacking-back nestlings from Scotland, Germany and Finland.

This morning (31/01) at 09.30am (local time in Spain), Roberto was crossing the Guadalquiver river by the bridge of "El Alamillo in Seville city and reports seeing an osprey, and one sporting a blue leg ring on left leg and a metal ring on the right, and a satellite transmitter on it's back. Judging by the plumage, he thought it to be a young bird. He immediately thought it was likely to be a Scottish osprey and contacted Roy Dennis who told him that it could be our bird from Loch Garten. Hence Roberto then e-mailed me, having checked our website and discovered from our tracking map and blog that it could be our Caley.

The bird was seen fishing, following 3 km of the river from north to south and vice versa between the bridge of "La Cartuja" and the end of the channel to the north close to the town of San Jeronimo. Roberto reported that at 10:36am he saw it catch a fish, a carp (Cyprinus sp) between the bridges of "La Barqueta" and "El Alamillo", and moved to the north passing a line of eucalyptus trees in the park of "El Alamillo". However he was not able to follow the bird to see where it went to eat its meal. But after checking the maps of Caledonia's movements, he feels that the bird probably headed to her usual resting area in the Rivera de Huelva river (3.5 km NW). He has said that he will try to relocate her during the weekend and if possible read the ring code. So until Roberto is able to confirm the ring lettering, we cannot be entirely sure at the moment, that it is Caledonia, but it has to be, surely?

With something of an air of understatement, he went on to say "I hope this info could be interesting for you and RSPB members that follow your blog and forum". Roberto, how right you are. If you are reading this, this is fantastic news for us all. Thank you so much for taking the trouble to make contact. Confirm that leg ring, matey, together with a picture if at all possible, and you'll be a hero for the bloggers! They will be so thrilled.

Very interestingly, Roberto was able to give some insight into Caley's behaviour and choice of hunting ground. Knowing from the blog that she makes frequent sorties to the centre of the city and the southern area, he suggests that the reason for this is the fish availability in the blind channel of the Guadalquivir river due to its width and the calmness of the water, giving better visibility, in comparisonto the flowing (and hence more coloured waters, probably?) of what he calls the "real" river which flows on the western side. Apparently, the current "real" river was constructed during the 1940s to divert the river from the centre of the city and avoid the recurrent flooding, so the ancient riverbed is now a closed channel similar to an urban lake linked through floodgates with the river.

Roberto's place of work at the Biological Station of Doñana in Sevilla city, is very close to the river and not far from Caley's resting area, so he's well-placed to confirm that it is Caley and report back to us on her activity. Very many thanks again, I say, to our new found friend Roberto.

I sense there could be a bit of a competition in the offing! Our very own blogger Val (and friends) are heading out to Seville this weekend in the hope of seeing Caley too. Who'll be first to confirm seeing her, I wonder? The more eyes looking the better. Good luck everyone


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 Post subject: Re: UK MIGRATION ~ 2013
PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2013 10:48 am 
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 Post subject: Re: UK MIGRATION ~ 2013
PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2013 1:16 am 
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:sum9: OMG there are a lot of awesome pictures of Caley she is so beautiful and so healthy looking she really seems to like it there
RSPB Operation Osprey

Caledonia in Seville January 2013 - photos courtesy of Valerie, Alison and Pip — in Seville, Andalucia.





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 Post subject: Re: UK MIGRATION ~ 2013
PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2013 9:23 am 
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Thanks Kittenface for that amazing link!

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 Post subject: Re: UK MIGRATION ~ 2013
PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2013 6:19 pm 
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Loch Garten osprey diary
New blog, but then you know this already..........


richard thaxton

12 Feb 2013 10:27 AM

With our "agents" Roberto and Manu in Seville, we are in the very privileged position of being able to get regular sighting reports and feedback on the movements of Caledonia in her chosen wintering area. How brilliant is that ! It feels like we are actually there and R & M are our virtual eyes. Thanks chaps, for your sighting news and other information on Caley's whereabouts and movements.

Seeing her on their way to work and on their local patch, means that their feedback for us is more up-to-the minute than the satellite data downloads, which are not in real time and lag behind. So what follows is a little "old news" in a way. Neverthlerss, for completeness, the latest information received from Mike (thanks Mike) is as follows. The data included records for 31 January and Caledonia was indeed, as reported by Roberto/Manu, on the Rio Guadalquivir near the El Alamillo bridge at 08.00 hrs GMT (09.00 hours local Spanish time). She was back again on the Guadalquivir on 3rd February. On 2nd and 4th February she was resting 15 km NW of the Huelva site near the El Esparragal reservoir. On 6th February at 16.00 hrs she was travelling SE some 8.5 km NW of Huelva. So over the last week she has done a fair bit of travelling.

Roberto has sent this photograph, showing Caley eatign a fish on top of a pylon. Apparently, he has also seen her "hanging out" with another osprey, an adult bird, seen fishing in close proximity to her and perched on the same pylon. Hmmm, has she got her eye on a potential suitor? Or just taking advantage of a masterclass in being an osprey from an adult osprey? It would be amazing wouldn't it, if it happened to be EJ or Odin?!! I'm sure if he gets the chance to check for rings, he'll be sure to tell us.



Next question is, what is the other species of bird on the pylon beneath Caley? On size and the suggestion of bluey-grey colouring to the head, I'd guess it is a male kestrel, though perhaps a bit thick-set, so a roller maybe? But a bit early I'd say for rollers to be back in Spain, unless they too have started to over-winter. Or is it a rock thrush? Roberto, can you tell us what it was? Many thanks.

Spring was in the air on the walk to work today. Great spotted woodpeckers drumming is now a given every morning. Chaffinches have joined the chorus of songsters now too, along with blue, coal, great and crested tits, plus cavorting ravens, tumbling about and appearing to have fun.

More news later this week, but next week Mike is unavailable to check on data, but Jayne will take a look, and hopefully report on the basic news.



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 Post subject: Re: UK MIGRATION ~ 2013
PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2013 10:52 pm 
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Loch Garten osprey diary
Proof: Here's our Caley......


richard thaxton

15 Feb 2013 9:51 AM

Caledonia has been a busy bird this week doing a lot of long distance travelling. The latest data download news from Mike is as follows.

On 7, 10 and 11 February she was recorded around the Rio Guadalquivir area, so this is also becoming a favourite spot. Is it the fishing or the attraction of the other osprey in the area?! On 7-8 February she probably stayed over on a large lake / reservoir in the Los Casares area, some 49 km NW of the Huelva and later in the day at 16.00 hrs on 8 February she was travelling S some 18 km SW of the Huelva and near the town of Benacazon.

On the 10th and 11th she was again travelling and was recorded on the 10th at 16.00 hrs 14 km NE of the Huelva on agricultural land and on the 11th at 16.00 hrs some 13 km E of the Huelva on land that appears to be part of the Hacienda De San Fernando estate. On 14th , Valentine's Day, she was back at the Huelva site, but with who........her mystery beau? You romantics out there will be hoping for that I'm sure, but the latest from Roberto suggests her companion is a female osprey.

The latest from Roberto is as follows. He has seen Caledonia again, and the other osprey, eating on the same pylon close to the Guadalquivir river (not the channel in the city). He thinks it is an unringed adult female. He could not see the breast band, but thinks it is a female according to the size and the robust appearance. This weekend he hopes to look for her again and take a fieldscope with him and dedicate a whole day to be sure it is not ringed. He also hopes to check on Caley and to read the ring and take better pictures. Many thanks matey, we really appreciate your endeavours on our behalf and we look forward to any news you can give us.

Since posting the above blog, I now have this latest from Roberto and a picture of Caledonia confirmed by her leg rings.

Roberto got the photo of Caledonia by digiscoping, though the quality is not the best. But hey, who cares, it's brilliant to have the photo og her. She is seen here eating a mullet-like fish on a pylon close to the Guadalquivir river this morning. The picture was taken from 160 m from a track and she was eating before, during and after his visit, so she was not disturbed. Roberto comments that you can see how the pale tips of upper feathers have now disappeared due to natural wear, and how the colour of upper parts, especially wings, is much paler because of decolouration by sunlight. The eye colour is also more yellow (like in adult birds) than orange-brown typical of chicks-fledglings. In short, she is progressively maturing and she must start moulting flight feathers.
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 Post subject: Re: UK MIGRATION ~ 2013
PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2013 11:04 pm 
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I hope all reading this post will contact a teacher. Connecting children is the best hope for our planet, conservation is a great way to accomplish this, glad Ospreys are part of this effort


Rob's update


This is another winter report where I’m happy to say that our Ospreys are doing nothing but getting fat catching fish down in Colombia, Venezuela, Bolivia (?), and Brazil. 
            North Fork Bob and Sr. Bones usually head north around the 20th of March, so we’re a month off from their departures. Bridgewater Art, our New Hampshire male, is on his first migration, so we don’t know when he’ll start north. He has a long way to go, so I won’t be surprised to see him head north before Bones or Bob.
            Belle will start her second migration north probably fairly late—she doesn’t have a nest to get back to yet. Maybe she’ll surprise us and get up early enough to start housekeeping. Will she go back to Deep Bottom Cove where she spent so much time last summer, or head over to the Cape, where she spent the last month or so before heading south for her second migration? This is the really fun part of tracking juveniles.
            Snowy, our almost 2-yr old, will be on his first trip north. He’s pretty much a teenager, and we all know they don’t get up before noon, so I don’t expect him to move before some time in April or even as late as May.
            Then there’s Bridger and Rammie—our 2 Westport River, MA, adults with cell-tower-based transmitters. We have no idea where Rammie is, but we know Bridger got as far south as Bolivia. It will be fascinating to get their data, if they make it back.
            So while our birds weren’t moving, I was. My New Hampshire colleague in the Osprey tagging game, Iain MacLeod, and I were invited to attend a workshop in Israel where, along with Osprey trackers from all over Europe, we brainstormed on how we can best take advantage of our tagged birds for educational outreach.
            Who’d have thought that our research would wind up in the Jerusalem Post?! 
            We also got some nice coverage up in New Hampshire: . (Don’t believe the line about me tagging more Ospreys than anyone else—not true!)
            Here are a couple of paragraphs describing where we're headed with the educational outreach. The British gang (Rutland Water) is spearheading this effort. They've set up a website that we'll use to connect schools on the breeding and wintering grounds of our target Ospreys. They've already got a couple of schools to sign up and the Rutland school is already email pals with a school in The Gambia, in western Africa. The site will be an Ospreys-only facebook-like site where school classes can communicate as they watch "their" Ospreys migrate north and south. We should soon have a map on the website that will automatically update as the data come in from all the Ospreys we're following--a couple on each flyway (a few North American schools will be logging on soon). The classes will be able to communicate about themselves, their schools, and their Ospreys and see where “their” Ospreys are. Here’s the website in its early, formative stage: 

 Linking satellite-tracking with education

 Background

 Ospreys have nested at Rutland Water, an internationally important site for wetland birds situated in central England, since 2001 following a successful re-introduction project.  In 2011, two adult Ospreys were fitted with GPS transmitters. The birds’ migration data was posted on the Rutland Osprey Project website and was avidly followed by thousands of people around the world, including many schools.  The data proved especially valuable in geography lessons where it was used to teach students about a diverse range of topics, including latitude and longitude, international development and different habitats and landscapes along the migratory flyway.

 The migration of the two Rutland Ospreys, and the interest it generated, demonstrated the unique ability of migratory birds to link people around the world. To develop this concept further, the Rutland Osprey Project has initiated a pilot project, linking schools in the UK and The Gambia in West Africa. Students, aged between 8 years and 15 years, have exchanged letters and videos helping them to develop their knowledge of Osprey and bird migration, and to learn about another country and culture in a new and exciting way. As part of the pilot scheme, the project has developed a programme of fieldtrips for three Gambian schools, led by a local bird guide. This has given the students an opportunity to observe Ospreys and other wildlife in their local area.

 Much of the initial work has been undertaken during trips by the Rutland Osprey Project team to West Africa but for the project to be sustainable in the long-term, computer and internet infrastructure is required in the African schools. This would allow students at those schools to follow satellite-tagged Ospreys online and to communicate with schools, via e-mail and Skype, in the UK and elsewhere on the flyways.

In addition to direct links between schools in the UK and The Gambia, there is potential to link schools and students from many other countries along the migration flyways between Europe and Africa and North and South America. With this in mind, the Rutland Osprey Project has set-up a trial website to demonstrate how schools could be connected. The website provides background information on each school and contact details of a teacher.

To register a school, go to this website and fill out some information about your school. Once that info is uploaded, the Rutland team will create a page for your school:
-----            
So, do you know a teacher that's really gung-ho and might be interested in something like this? We think the prime ages for this are middle-school kids, but we’re equal opportunity educators—older students could design research projects and really play with the data. Let me know if you have any ideas on this!
Spring, and our Ospreys, are coming!


Rob Bierregaard
421 Cotswold Ln
Wynnewood, PA 19096
rbierreg@gmail.com
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 Post subject: Re: UK MIGRATION ~ 2013
PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2013 7:58 pm 
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Caledonia the osprey living high life in Seville :loveshow:


By ALISTAIR MUNRO
Published on Tuesday 5 March 2013 13:02



SHE IS a renegade juvenile, sunning herself in Spain. But her departure from protocol has saved her life. Caledonia, an osprey who fledged from Loch Garten in the Scottish Highlands last summer, is living the high life on the streets of Seville.



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