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 Post subject: Re: IN THE NEWS~2015
PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2015 11:57 pm 
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Injured golden eagle rescued by deputy

SUMMIT COUNTY — A Summit County Sheriff’s Deputy is being credited with saving an injured golden eagle Thursday afternoon.

Deputy Buck Bufton said he discovered the bird in some sagebrush in Brown’s Canyon. Bufton said it appeared the golden eagle had been feeding on a dead rabbit on the side of the road and had been hit by a vehicle.

“From what the citizens were telling me, a truck drove by,” Bufton said. “They didn’t actually see him get hit by the truck, but they saw him go across the front of the truck and then land on the ground. We don’t know who it was. We don’t know what kind of vehicle it was, but it appears he was hit by a vehicle while moving across the road.”

A wildlife unit was contacted and helped Bufton corner the golden eagle. He said he could tell the bird’s left wing was damaged and he was able to capture it using his coat.
“He was really big,” Bufton said. “I mean, the biggest bird I’ve seen up close like that, that type of bird. And he didn’t seem real aggressive. He more wanted to stay away from us.”

The bird was transported to the Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Northern Utah and officials reported it had a compound fracture to the left wing and had lost quite a bit of blood.
Bald and golden eagles are federally protected species under The Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and the Lacey Act, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

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 Post subject: Re: IN THE NEWS~2015
PostPosted: Fri Mar 06, 2015 12:11 am 
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Thanks kittenface, I think golden eagles are beautiful. Hope this guy pulls through this ordeal and with rehab attains the highest quality of life possible! :snowflake6:


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 Post subject: Re: IN THE NEWS~2015
PostPosted: Fri Mar 06, 2015 12:42 am 
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SWINWK,
If anyone can help the Golden it is Utah Rehab. They are the Heroes of Phoenix the Golden that was in the wildfire and half dead when he was able to be rescued.

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 Post subject: Re: IN THE NEWS~2015
PostPosted: Tue Mar 10, 2015 10:18 am 
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Great segment on NBC news last night...Hanover, PA Eagles have gone viral!!!


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 Post subject: Re: IN THE NEWS~2015
PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 6:36 pm 
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Well, here comes a new challenge to the birds.... Falcons were mentioned in the article.


Clip from the article:

Who’s At Risk?
This disease has been indiscriminate. So far this AI outbreak has obliterated commercial turkey farms, commercial chicken farms, a backyard flock of guinea hens, captive raptors (such as hawks and falcons), a 4-H chicken flock and others. Every backyard flock, especially flocks on range or in runs that have no solid roof, are wide open targets.

I am guessing here but if we start seeing on cam birds dying suddenly... this may be the culprit...

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 Post subject: Re: IN THE NEWS~2015
PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 9:14 pm 
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Well C R A P, thats all they need now.

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 Post subject: Re: IN THE NEWS~2015
PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 10:06 pm 
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YIKES!!!

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 Post subject: Re: IN THE NEWS~2015
PostPosted: Sat Mar 14, 2015 12:27 pm 
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Illinois to remove peregrine falcon from threatened list

SPRINGFIELD — A bird that was nearly wiped out of existence by a now-banned pesticide is poised to come off of Illinois' threatened species list.



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 Post subject: Re: IN THE NEWS~2015
PostPosted: Mon Mar 16, 2015 9:18 pm 
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UPDATE: Woman Charged with Killing Hunter's Falcon to Save Duck
This is just horrible. :furious:


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 Post subject: Re: IN THE NEWS~2015
PostPosted: Tue Mar 17, 2015 12:22 am 
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TERRE HAUTE, Indiana — Two peregrine falcons have been spotted on Vigo County Courthouse as they look for a nesting place.

The Tribune-Star (http://bit.ly/1bczUnk ) reports the pair once had a nest at Indiana State University's Statesman Towers, which are set to be demolished in April.

ISU professor Steve Lima, the falcons' unofficial keeper, said efforts were made to make the birds "uncomfortable" at the buildings in an attempt to get them to nest elsewhere. That may have been successful, Lima said, although they're still seen at Statesman Towers nearly every day.

"We don't really know what they are doing," he said.

Lima said he often sees the falcons at the courthouse, but he said it doesn't seem high enough for a nest. They've also been spotted at St. Benedict Church and the WTHI-TV transmission tower.

A nesting box was placed on the Sycamore Building in downtown Terre Haute, but the falcons haven't been spotted on a camera at the site. It seemed like the best spot for the falcons, Lima said, but they haven't shown interest.

Lima expects the falcons will stay in Terre Haute.

"This is their city; they won't go anywhere," he said. "This is their territory."

Last yr. Indiana State Univ. Business Building Terre Haute couple were
m: 1687-02129
f: B/R G/C?

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 Post subject: Re: IN THE NEWS~2015
PostPosted: Wed Mar 25, 2015 5:39 pm 
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I just get so F'n mad :furious: when I read about this C R A P

25 MARCH 2015 | 1:40 PM
Osprey's leg entangled in balloon string.



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 Post subject: Re: IN THE NEWS~2015
PostPosted: Fri Mar 27, 2015 7:34 pm 
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This story originates one county east of the peregrine falcon nest in Petersburg, In:



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 Post subject: Re: IN THE NEWS~2015
PostPosted: Thu Apr 02, 2015 1:46 pm 
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Didn't realize Albatross would land on ships @ sea:



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 Post subject: Re: IN THE NEWS~2015
PostPosted: Thu Apr 16, 2015 2:03 pm 
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CAMPUS NEWS
Restoration work to start at MacKay Heating Plant


Restoration work at MacKay Heating Plant, which provides heat to UB’s South Campus, will begin next month.

The 84-year-old tower, which last underwent serious renovation in 1973, will undergo repairs to ensure its structural integrity, prevent water damage and ensure its long-term viability as a peregrine falcon nest site.

It is necessary to repair the tower in late spring and summer, when the heating needs of South Campus are minimal.

To prepare for the project, the university shut off the live video feed of the falcon nest in the tower. The camera will remain off for the duration of the work, which is expected to be finished in September. At that time, UB officials will reactivate the live video feed.

UB officials are working with the state Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and local wildlife rehabilitators to ensure the safety of the falcons. Several eggs currently are in the nesting box.

Because the work may interrupt the adult falcons’ ability to care for the chicks, DEC wildlife biologists will remove the chicks two weeks after they hatch, expected to be in the middle of May. The chicks will be placed with a licensed wildlife rehabilitator, Hawk Creek Wildlife Center in East Aurora, and eventually released into the wild.

The tower will remain open to the adult falcons during construction. They are expected to remain in the area, protecting their territory.

International Chimney Corp. of Williamsville was awarded the contract after submitting a bid of $263,000. The work, scheduled from May to September, includes structural repairs to the masonry, painting the window frames and a new liner for the chimney stack.

A pair of peregrine falcons began nesting at MacKay tower in 2009. Since then, 22 chicks have hatched there. While not considered endangered by the federal government since 1999, they are listed as endangered by the DEC.


In addition to UB, there are eight peregrine falcon nests in the Buffalo Niagara region. They are at the Buffalo Central Terminal, Statler City, the Buffalo Outer Harbor, the Richardson Olmstead Complex, the North Grand Island Bridge, the South Grand Island Bridge, the New York Power Authority reservoir and the Canadian side of Niagara Falls.

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 Post subject: Re: IN THE NEWS~2015
PostPosted: Thu Apr 16, 2015 2:14 pm 
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kittenface wrote:
CAMPUS NEWS
Restoration work to start at MacKay Heating Plant


Restoration work at MacKay Heating Plant, which provides heat to UB’s South Campus, will begin next month.

The 84-year-old tower, which last underwent serious renovation in 1973, will undergo repairs to ensure its structural integrity, prevent water damage and ensure its long-term viability as a peregrine falcon nest site.

It is necessary to repair the tower in late spring and summer, when the heating needs of South Campus are minimal.

To prepare for the project, the university shut off the live video feed of the falcon nest in the tower. The camera will remain off for the duration of the work, which is expected to be finished in September. At that time, UB officials will reactivate the live video feed.

UB officials are working with the state Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and local wildlife rehabilitators to ensure the safety of the falcons. Several eggs currently are in the nesting box.

Because the work may interrupt the adult falcons’ ability to care for the chicks, DEC wildlife biologists will remove the chicks two weeks after they hatch, expected to be in the middle of May. The chicks will be placed with a licensed wildlife rehabilitator, Hawk Creek Wildlife Center in East Aurora, and eventually released into the wild.

The tower will remain open to the adult falcons during construction. They are expected to remain in the area, protecting their territory.

International Chimney Corp. of Williamsville was awarded the contract after submitting a bid of $263,000. The work, scheduled from May to September, includes structural repairs to the masonry, painting the window frames and a new liner for the chimney stack.

A pair of peregrine falcons began nesting at MacKay tower in 2009. Since then, 22 chicks have hatched there. While not considered endangered by the federal government since 1999, they are listed as endangered by the DEC.


In addition to UB, there are eight peregrine falcon nests in the Buffalo Niagara region. They are at the Buffalo Central Terminal, Statler City, the Buffalo Outer Harbor, the Richardson Olmstead Complex, the North Grand Island Bridge, the South Grand Island Bridge, the New York Power Authority reservoir and the Canadian side of Niagara Falls.



Wow I am not sure what to think about all of this! Two weeks and taken from their parents just doesn't seem right but I guess we have to trust the authorities!?!?!?!? Oh dear dear and dear - won't see any fledging.......

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 Post subject: Re: IN THE NEWS~2015
PostPosted: Thu Apr 16, 2015 4:53 pm 
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Wait....I am very confused..what nest is this? Is this the Buffalo nest with Dixie and Yankee?

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 Post subject: Re: IN THE NEWS~2015
PostPosted: Thu Apr 23, 2015 2:47 pm 
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Peregrine falcon breeding at SAHS
April 22, 2015


A unique opportunity for students at Stillwater Area High School to witness a rare falcon breeding procedure. When one of the peregrine falcons at the school’s raptor center produced infertile eggs, science teacher and Master licensed falconer Andy Weaver decided to attempt artificial insemination. He used a sample that was shipped overnight from a breeder in Iowa. Weaver said that type of long-distance procedure is rare and something not done at the high school level.


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 Post subject: Re: IN THE NEWS~2015
PostPosted: Tue Apr 28, 2015 9:40 pm 
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WHAT THE HE** IS THIS WORLD COMING TO?

B.C. officials investigate ‘abhorrent’ killing of eagles

The B.C. Conservation Officer Service is investigating what one officer described as an “abhorrent wildlife crime,” after the dead carcasses of between 14 and 18 eagles were found earlier this month discarded in plastic bags along a rural road in the South Cariboo region.
The cause of death has not been determined but the dead birds have been transferred to a veterinary lab for testing.
“It’s beyond my wildest dreams why anybody would want to shoot such a majestic and helpless creature,” James Zucchelli said.
“Basically, they’re scavenging – out on the range there’s afterbirth and there are things that are attracting them – and just to shoot them and dump them is just horrible.”
The birds range in age from immature to mature and include at least one golden eagle, said Mr. Zucchelli. The rest are believed to be bald eagles.
Conservation officers don’t yet know why anyone would kill the birds, which were placed individually in garbage bags and dumped along North Bonaparte Road south of 100 Mile House.
A member of the public alerted authorities.
In his 16 years as a conservation officer, Mr. Zucchelli said he’s never seen anything like this.
“There are tests being done on the cause of death to determine potential poisoning and or shooting,” he said.
“We can use all forms of forensic analysis on the birds and on the contents of the birds’ stomachs and other information that we can gather from the birds themselves and in the bags that could potentially lead us to suspects.”
He said he hopes to have the results of those tests within a month.
The service doesn’t want to disclose further information about what they’ve gathered so far, but Mr. Zucchelli said it does not appear the eagles were poached for ceremonial purposes, which has occurred in the past in B.C.
He said the service is considering the possibility that a livestock producer may have killed the eagles believing they were preying on newborn calves. It’s calving season on cattle ranches throughout B.C.
“There has been long-held myths about eagles and calves, that eagles will kill calves. However, it’s a very, very rare circumstance and it’s more based on the husbandry of the producer,” he said.
Biologist David Hancock called that belief “nonsense.”
“That’s been disproven time and time and time again,” said Mr. Hancock, founder of the Hancock Wildlife Foundation and its popular “eagle cams.”
An adult female eagle can lift three pounds, he said.
“There’s not many calves that are three pounds,” he added. “It’s total nonsense.”
But eagles have been hunted in the past. Until 1953, the U.S. government offered a $2 bounty for them.
“Today, these are the most treasured animals of our ecosystem,” Mr. Hancock said. “But there are people who have got this old attitude that everything that’s alive is a competitor.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Two bald eagles found shot

JAMES CITY — For the second time in April, the Virginia Wildlife Center has received a wounded bald eagle, with evidence that it had been shot.

On Monday, the center received a bird that the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries rescued at Carter's Grove Plantation. Veterinarians at the center determined that the eagle was unable to stand on its left leg.

Examination determined that tiny shards of metal were embedded in the eagle's ankle joint, an indication that it had been shot.

The damage was beyond repair and the bird had to be euthanized, according to Randy Huwa of the center.
On April 17 the center admitted a bird from the Marine Base at Quantico that had been struck by a dump truck while feeding on a deer carcass. The bird sustained significant injuries in the truck accident but was also determined to have had a previous gun shot wound.
This bird was also euthanized.

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 Post subject: Re: IN THE NEWS~2015
PostPosted: Thu Apr 30, 2015 10:49 pm 
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Bird flu found in first wild Minnesota raptor

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources collected the dead Cooper’s hawk in Yellow Medicine County as part of its effort to track and understand the spread of H5N2 bird flu. Waterfowl don’t themselves get sick or die from the flu, but raptors — birds of prey — are thought to die once infected.

A homeowner near St. Leo reported that on April 14, the Cooper’s hawk flew into his home’s deck and died. “The immediate cause of death was running into a window,” said Patrick Redig, a University of Minnesota veterinary professor and co-founder of the school’s Raptor Center. Later testing showed that the bird had been exposed to H5N2.

The hawk discovery doesn’t indicate the virus in wild birds is the direct cause of the bird flu, said Lou Cornicelli, DNR Wildlife Research manager. Yellow Medicine County doesn’t have any infected poultry farms, but nearby Lyon County does.

The DNR said it does not know of any recent raptor die-offs

More here:

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 Post subject: Re: IN THE NEWS~2015
PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2015 12:29 pm 
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Matrix wrote:
Well, here comes a new challenge to the birds.... Falcons were mentioned in the article.


Clip from the article:

Who’s At Risk?
This disease has been indiscriminate. So far this AI outbreak has obliterated commercial turkey farms, commercial chicken farms, a backyard flock of guinea hens, captive raptors (such as hawks and falcons), a 4-H chicken flock and others. Every backyard flock, especially flocks on range or in runs that have no solid roof, are wide open targets.

I am guessing here but if we start seeing on cam birds dying suddenly... this may be the culprit...



More info via NABC facebook:

More Avian Influenza information from the Bird Banding Lab in the US:
Within the past 6-8 months, highly pathogenic strains of Avian Influenza (AI) have been documented within the US and Canada. At this time, three different strains have been identified: one found only in domestic poultry flocks and two found in wild birds. Two of these strains are genetically distinct and may have evolved in North America. The third strain is identical to a highly pathogenic strain recorded in eastern Asia. To date, there have been no human cases of AI reported from North America that resulted from exposure to birds on this continent.
The infected wild North American b irds have primarily been waterfowl and a very small number of large raptors that could have fed on infected waterfowl. These infected birds have been found at scattered locations in the western half of North America with the greatest number of cases reported from Washington and Oregon.
The status of highly pathogenic AI in North America is very dynamic at this time. Wild birds continue to be tested and the geographic distribution and variety of bird species infected with these strains will likely expand. These strains are not believed to be easily transmitted to humans, but that status could change as these viruses evolve. Banders need to keep informed of the latest developments regarding the status of highly pathogenic AI in North America. Websites maintained by the Centers for Disease Control and the National Wildlife Health Center are regularly updated.
Links to these websites are provided below and banders should periodically visit these websites to learn the latest information on the status of AI on this continent:
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/avianflu/index.htm
http://www.nwhc.usgs.gov/disease_…/avian_influenza/index.jsp
Banders working at locations where highly pathogenic AI strains have been identified, and especially those working with taxa known to be infected with these strains, should take all necessary precautions to prevent transmission of the disease. Health professionals should be consulted to learn what precautions are necessary which may include wearing masks, gloves, and outer garments/footwear that can be routinely disinfected prior to removal.
While such precautions are not currently necessary for banders working in locations and with taxa not known to be infected with highly pathogenic AI, banders are strongly urged to carefully consider the hygiene procedures practiced by anyone coming in direct contact with wild birds and their practices for holding birds prior to banding. For personal hygiene, anyone touching wild birds should thoroughly wash their hands with soap and water or an alcohol-based disinfectant before eating or using any device that comes in contact with their skin, such as a cell phone. Clothes worn during banding, especially any garments soiled by birds, should be thoroughly washed before another individual comes in contact with those items. Prior to banding, each bird should be held in a bag, cage or other device where they have no direct contact with other birds. These holding devices should either be disposable or able to be disinfected and washed after use. Use of any holding bag, cage or other device where multiple birds come into direct contact should be discontinued.
In situations where banders allow release of wild birds by members of the public, banders should obtain guidance about this practice with respect to their potential liability resulting from the possible exposure of the public to highly pathogenic AI.
Follow ing common-sense precautions, banders should be able to continue their banding operations without fear of becoming infected with AI. Their banding practices should follow necessary precautions to prevent the spread of AI or other diseases among birds. Banders must keep informed of the changing status of AI in North America. Should this disease become more widespread and/or affect a greater variety of avian taxa, then bird banding procedures may require additional modifications to prevent exposure to this disease.

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